Sinister Synergy

24 10 2010

Yet again TechCruch points out the errs of the world, as it is wont to do, in this piece chronicling the Wall Street Journal’s shoddy coverage of a Facebook privacy breach.

Ignoring the irony of bad reporting in the “information age,” TechCrunch’s coverage highlights the fact that MySpace, a NewsCorp entity, was deliberately left out of an article covering Facebook’s many issues with user privacy controls. Michael Arrington, the TechCrunch contributer covering the incident, points out that this is probably an effort directed by the WSJ and Myspace’s parent company, NewsCorp, in relation to MySpace’s concurrent relaunch of its social networking system.

While synergy was traditionally seen as a good thing in the eyes of the corporate media, we now (and doubtfully for the first time) bear its consequences. The Journal is known for being one of the world’s best newspapers, yet we find out that we are being denied critical information on a socially relevant issue to protect MySpace from bad press?

I call bullshit. This type of integration of agendas is what’s wrong with corporate media today; the interests of the corporate machine outweigh the obligations of its smaller, information-based subdivisions. It’s everything that’s wrong with the authoritarian theory of the media (in which society’s needs outweigh those of the individual).

Like Arrington, I can’t really close this one out with a solution, but I will admit that this is a sad state of affairs. I suppose the most we can do at this point is bitch and moan online, unless like Robert McChesney suggests, we completely revamp our media with a complete structural overhaul. Yeah, fat chance.

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